Renunciation of U.S. Citizenship

There are two requirements for a Canadian looking to renounce his or her U.S. citizenship. Such an individual must voluntarily, and with the intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship, execute the following steps: (1) appear in person before a U.S. consular or diplomatic officer, in Canada, at a U.S. Embassy or consulate; and (2) sign an oath of renunciation. This process requires the renouncing party to abandon all the rights and privileges associated with being a United States citizen. It is a very serious process requiring a very earnest decision that cannot be taken back. If approved by the consulate, renunciation is irrevocable. For those individuals who are inclined toward renunciation of U.S. citizenship, the process is fairly straightforward. There are four basic steps to follow. The first step is to complete and return forms DS-4079, DS-4080 and DS-4081 to the Department of State.  Secondly, the individual looking to renounce citizenship must contact a U.S. Consulate in Canada and request an appointment for an interview. The renouncing individual will need to bring copies of completed forms and scanned copies of documents to the appointment at the consulate, including a U.S. passport, evidence of U.S. citizenship, a valid Canadian passport, evidence of […]
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Number of people renouncing U.S. citizenship up in 2013

With 1.1 million immigrants coming to the United States every year, it’s rare for people to no longer want to be U.S. citizens. However, in 2013 the number of people renouncing U.S. citizenship is at an all time high. According to The Wall Street Journal, 2,369 people have renounced citizenship this year. That number is up 33% from the previous all time high in 2011 of 1,781. What exactly is renunciation? Renunciation is when a person decides to voluntarily give up their citizenship, in this case U.S. citizenship. Why do people renounce citizenship? It is commonly believed that many people take the path of renouncing U.S. citizenship for tax purposes. Forbes Magazine reports that may just be the case due to strict U.S. tax laws. For U.S. citizens living abroad, many end up paying a double tax. They pay taxes where they currently live, but also still pay U.S. taxes on their earned income abroad.  Others leave their U.S. citizenship behind for personal reasons dealing with family matters or matters of convenience. Some may have started new lives in different countries and do not plan on needing a U.S. passport any longer. What does a person have to do to […]
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