Tips for Inviting Oath Ceremony Guests

Taking your oath to receive U.S. citizenship is an important moment, one many wish to share with the people in their life that supported them along the way. We want you to have the best experience possible for the day of your ceremony, so we collected the following tips for inviting guests...
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Delving Into Derivative Citizenship

Derivative citizenship is the term used to describe citizenship that is obtained by someone who is under the age of 18 whose parents naturalize. Obtaining citizenship in this manner is automatic. The requirements can vary depending on which year naturalization occurred.  Derivative citizenship is distinguishable from acquisition of citizenship. Acquisition of citizenship occurs when the child of a U.S. citizen born abroad gains citizenship, whereas derivative citizenship occurs when a parent of a foreign national minor naturalizes.  The regulations regarding derivative citizenship have altered significantly over the years. For example, the requirements in 1934 were significantly different from those in 1978. Determination of whether someone is eligible for derivative citizenship is based on the date of the last act. Currently, the Child Citizenship Act (CCA), which is included in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), governs law on the derivation of citizenship.  The CCA went into effect on February 27, 2001. This law is in effect for children born or adopted today or at any time since February 28, 1983. The current law allows foreign-born, biological and adopted children of U.S. citizens to obtain U.S. citizenship when they enter the U.S. as lawful permanent residents. In order for a child […]
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Citizenship for Children Born Abroad to U.S. Citizens

The qualifications determining whether a person born abroad can acquire U.S. citizenship vary based on each situation. Derivative citizenship is governed by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). This can be broken up into four main categories: birth abroad in wedlock to two U.S. citizen parents; birth abroad in wedlock to a U.S. citizen and an alien; birth abroad out-of-wedlock to a U.S. citizen father; and, birth abroad out-of-wedlock to a U.S. citizen mother.  Birth Abroad in Wedlock to Two U.S. Citizen Parents A person who is born to a U.S. citizen mother and U.S. citizen father acquires U.S. citizenship at birth, so long as one of the parents has had a residence in the U.S. prior to the person’s birth. Birth Abroad in Wedlock to a U.S. Citizen and an Alien  A slightly different criteria applies when a person is born abroad to a U.S. citizen and foreign national who are married. The U.S. citizen parent must have physically resided in the U.S. for a certain period of time. The amount of time required is governed by statute.  Birth Abroad Out-of-Wedlock to a U.S. Citizen Father Under the new section of the Immigration and Nationality Act, the following criteria […]
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Naturalization Through Military Service

One way to obtain citizenship is naturalization through military service. Requirements will vary based on whether time in the military was served during peacetime or during periods of hostility. Generally, the applicants must show at least one year of qualifying service. These specific requirements are governed by special provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).  Applicants enjoy certain benefits that are not offered to other types of applicants. Some benefits are that service members and their families may gain citizenship even if they don’t meet all the general requirements, service members may not have to pay any application or biometric fees, and the process may be expedited. Service members will need to demonstrate that they meet either section 328 or 329 of the INA. They will then fill out the Citizenship application form. A major benefit of naturalization through military service is that members of the U.S. forces and their families may be eligible for expedited or overseas naturalization. Active-duty service members and families may be interviewed and naturalized abroad at certain U.S. embassies, consulates and military installations. In addition, families of U.S. citizen service members who are or will be stationed abroad may be eligible for expedited naturalization.  […]
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How to Calculate a Day for Immigration Purposes

Many immigrants and visitors to the United States are often unsure how USCIS defines a day. Although it may not seem like a major issue, miscalculating days either within or out of the United States can have major consequences for foreign nationals either immigrating to or visiting the U.S. It is helpful to divide this topic into two categories: nonimmigrant and immigrant purposes. Nonimmigrant purposes Nonimmigrants refer to people who do not wish to reside and work permanently within the United States. Some examples of this include foreign nationals visiting the United States as tourists or foreign nationals coming to the United States to work on a temporary visa. For nonimmigrant purposes, any traditional 24-hour period in which the foreign national spends even one hour in the United States is considered by USCIS to be one day.  This is something important to keep in mind, especially when making travel arrangements. For example, if a foreign national’s flight leaves early in the morning one day after the expiration of a visa, the foreign national is technically not authorized to be in the United States. In the same vein, foreign nationals run the risk of facing difficulties entering or traveling to the […]
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USCIS Aims to Prevent Fraud with Redesigned Certificates of Citizenship and Naturalization

Following a successful pilot program, USCIS began issuing redesigned Certificates of Citizenship and Naturalization on June 5, 2018. The new certificate design was piloted at the Norfolk, Tampa, Minneapolis-St. Paul and Sacramento Field Offices, as well as the Nebraska Service Center. The eight forms that have been redesigned by USCIS are the N-550, N-570, N-578, N-560A, N-560AB, N-645, N-645A and N-561. All of these forms pertain to documentation of some of the various circumstances under which either citizenship or naturalization may occur. The goal of this redesign initiative is to stay ahead of counterfeiters, combat fraud and safeguard the legal immigration system.  The newly redesigned certificates of citizenship and naturalization feature a large, central image against a patterned background. This complex patterned background helps deter the alteration of personal data which can help prevent identity theft and fraud. In addition, each certificate now features a unique image that is only visible under ultraviolet light. Any attempts to alter or tamper with this image will be evident. Posthumous Certificates of Naturalization and Special Certificates of Citizenship each feature a different image, but are still protected by the same fraud-deterrent security features as the other redesigned documents. Changing the design and printing […]
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USCIS to Welcome More Than 25,000 New U.S. Citizens During Presidents’ Day Naturalization Ceremonies

This year, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will celebrate Presidents’ Day by welcoming more than 25,000 new U.S. citizens during 162 naturalization ceremonies across the country from Feb. 14 through Feb. 22. USCIS Acting Director Lori Scialabba said, “It fills me with pride to know that 25,000 immigrants will take the Oath of Allegiance and become U.S. citizens during the week that celebrates Presidents’ Day. These new U.S. citizens will be given rights, responsibilities and opportunities that will strengthen and shape the future of our great nation, just as generations of immigrants have done before them. By choosing to naturalize, they are confirming their commitment to our country and furthering our legacy as a nation of immigrants.” Acting Deputy Director Tracy Renaud will administer the Oath of Allegiance to 50 candidates and deliver keynote remarks during a naturalization ceremony held on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate, Museum & Gardens in Mount Vernon, Virginia. Other special naturalization ceremonies include one held in our very own Buffalo, N.Y., on Feb. 21 at the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Site and also at the Washington Crossing Historic Park in Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania, on Feb. 21. USCIS also urges participants […]
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