Civics Test Update: Don’t Let the Civics Test Stop You From Becoming a U.S. Citizen

If you are a foreign national seeking to become an American citizen, the naturalization process can be a mixture of stress and excitement. One of the last steps to complete before naturalizing to a citizen is the civics test. Passing the civics test is required to become a citizen. A U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) officer will ask a set of up to 10 civics questions. You must answer at least six of these questions correctly. While this may sound difficult, the good news is that USCIS has published all 100 possible civics questions online for review.  One difficulty that you may face when preparing for this exam is the fact that answers to some of the questions will periodically change based on elections. Questions that vary include identifying U.S. Senators, U.S. Representatives, the President, the Vice President, the number of justices on the Supreme Court, the Chief Justice, state Governors, the political party of the President, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. USCIS publishes up-to-date material regarding these civics test updates that foreign nationals should use to prepare for the civics exam.  As a result of the 2018 election, the answers to some questions have or […]
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Breaking News: President Trump to End Birthright Citizenship for Children Born on U.S. Soil to non-American Citizens

President Donald Trump has announced that he plans to sign an executive order that will end birthright citizenship for children born on U.S. soil to non-American citizens. If the President follows through with this promise, the decision would defy the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Adopted in 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment states that “[a]ll persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and the State wherein they reside.” This provision of the Constitution is known as the Citizenship Clause. It is unclear whether President Trump actually has the authority to implement the proposed policy, considering the fact that birthright citizenship is engraved in the Fourteenth Amendment. According to Trump, however, “[i]t was always told to me that you needed a constitutional amendment. Guess what? You don’t. You can definitely do it with an act of Congress. But now they’re saying I can do it just with an executive order.” In reality, amending the U.S. Constitution was never meant to be that simple. In fact, Article Five prescribes only two ways to amend the Constitution: (1) Congress can propose an amendment, which must then be approved by both […]
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Naturalization Civics Test Answer Updates

Are you preparing for the naturalization test? If you have an upcoming naturalization interview, be sure that you know the answers to the most current history and government questions. Periodically, answers change to reflect the results of federal and state elections and appointments or to clarify content and ensure consistency in terminology. The revised answers to the questions below are effective immediately. Question 20 – Who is one of your state’s U.S. senators now? A. The answer to this question may have changed for your state on Jan. 3, 2017, when the 115th Congress began to meet. You can find the name of one of your state’s current U.S. senators here. Question 23 – Name your U.S. representative. A. The answer to this question also may have changed for your state on Jan. 3, 2017, when the 115th Congress began to meet. You can find the name of your state’s current representative here. Question 28 – What is the name of the President of the United States now? A. You may answer: Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, or Trump. Question 29 – What is the name of the Vice President of the United States now? A. You may answer: Michael […]
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Citizenship Through Permanent Residency (General Requirements)

If you are a green card holder of at least 5 years and meet the following requirements, you may apply for naturalization: Be 18 or older; Be a green card holder for at least 5 years immediately preceding the date of filing the Application for Naturalization Have lived within the state, or USCIS district with jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence, for at least 3 months prior to the date of filing the application; Have continuous residence in the United States as a green card holder for at least 5 years immediately preceding the date of the filing the application; Be physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the 5 years immediately preceding the date of filing the application; Reside continuously within the United States from the date of application for naturalization up to the time of naturalization; Be able to read, write, and speak English and have knowledge and an understanding of U.S. history and government (civics); and Be a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the United States during all relevant […]
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