U.S. Citizenship for Children Born Abroad: Things to Know

The United States in one of 30 countries around the world that offers birthright citizenship to any person born on U.S. soil. Birth in the United States is the most straightforward way one can acquire U.S. citizenship, but it is not the only way a person is born a U.S. citizen.  In addition to birth in the U.S., Congress has enacted laws which allow persons born outside the U.S. to a U.S. citizen parent(s) may acquire or derive U.S. citizenship at birth.  Requirements for derivative U.S. citizenship is governed by the Immigration and Nationality Act (“INA”)—if the requirements are met, the child automatically derives citizenship upon his or her birth abroad.  Determining Whether You are a U.S. Citizen  There are several categories of derivative U.S. citizenship available to children born abroad, each with different requirements.  Child Born in Wedlock  Child of Two U.S. Citizen Parents; Child of U.S. Citizen Parent and U.S. National; or Child of U.S. Citizen Parent and Foreign National Parent. Child Born Out of Wedlock Child of U.S. Citizen Father; or Child of U.S. Citizen Mother.  Establishing Your U.S. Citizenship Claim  U.S. parents of children born abroad should immediately notify the U.S. Embassy or consulate in the country of […]
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Preparing for Your Marriage-Based Green Card Interview

Obtaining lawful permanent resident status by marriage to a U.S. citizen is a multi-step process. The first step of the marriage-based Green Card process involves the filing of Form I-130, Petition for Alien Resident, by the U.S. Citizen spouse...
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First Time Entry with An Immigrant Visa

Whether you are pursuing a marriage based green card, immigrating for your work, or being sponsored by a family member, obtaining a visa to enter the United States can be a time-consuming, stressful, and frustrating process. Every step of the way...
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Tips for Inviting Oath Ceremony Guests

Taking your oath to receive U.S. citizenship is an important moment, one many wish to share with the people in their life that supported them along the way. We want you to have the best experience possible for the day of your ceremony, so we collected the following tips for inviting guests. Who Can Come to my U.S. Citizenship Oath Ceremony? Generally speaking, anyone can come to your U.S. citizenship oath ceremony: family, friends, children, anyone you want! How Many Guests Can I Bring? The number of people you can bring to your ceremony depends greatly on the location and venue of the ceremony itself. For instance, the fire code may limit the number of people allowed in the room. If the number of people taking the oath is close of the maximum number of people allowed in the room, then your guest may not be allowed into the ceremony. It is important to remember that the oath ceremony is long, and so it could be possible that if you bring many guests, they may have to resort to standing in the back, which could be tiresome.  Who Should I Bring? This is completely up to you! We do recommend considering […]
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USCIS Announces Plans to Improve the Naturalization Test

USCIS has announced that it will begin implementing an updated naturalization test beginning December 2020 or early 2021. In order to naturalize, candidates must demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of U.S. civics and the English language by passing a naturalization test.   In December 2018, USCIS formed a naturalization test revision working group with members from across the agency. The working group has been reviewing and updating the naturalization test questions, as well as assessing potential changes to the speaking portion of the test. USCIS is receiving the input of experts in the field to ensure that this process is fair and transparent.  USCIS has the power, granted by Congress, to develop, administer and occasionally revise the naturalization civics test to ensure accuracy and timeliness of content.  It has been 10 years since revisions were last made to the naturalization test. On May 3, 2019, USCIS signed the Revision of the Naturalization Civics Test Memorandum.  As explained in the memorandum, “the purpose of these revisions is to create a meaningful, comprehensive, uniform, and efficient test that will assess applicants’ knowledge and understanding of U.S. history, government, principles, and values.”  Presently, the civics portion of the naturalization test consists of 10 questions out […]
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Fun Facts & Information on Naturalization

Here at Berardi Immigration Law, we are proud to help our clients make their American dreams a reality! What better way to celebrate the upcoming Fourth of July holiday than to take a look at some interesting facts on naturalization. Naturalization is the process through which a green card holder in the United States can become a U.S. citizen.  Fun facts on naturalization: During the last decade, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) welcomed more than 7.4 million naturalized citizens.  In fiscal year 2018, over 757,000 people were naturalized. Since 2009, USCIS welcomed approximately 620,000 to 780,000 citizens each year during naturalization ceremonies across the United States and around the world. In fiscal year 2018, 73 percent of all naturalized citizens resided in 10 states (in descending order): California, Florida, New York, Texas, New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Washington. In fiscal year 2018, the leading metropolitan areas of residence for naturalization applicants were New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (15 percent), Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA (7.8 percent), and Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL (7.3 percent). In fiscal year 2018, the top countries of origin for naturalization were in the following descending order:  Mexico, India, Philippines, Cuba, and People’s Republic of […]
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