Employment Based Visas

Every fiscal year, approximately 140,000 employment-based immigrant visas are made available to qualified applicants under the provisions of US immigration law. Employment based immigrant visas are divided into five preference categories. These five preference categories include priority workers and persons with extraordinary ability, professionals holding advanced degrees and persons of exceptional ability, skilled workers, professionals, and unskilled workers, certain special immigrants, and immigrant investors.  Certain spouses and children may accompany or follow-to-join employment-based immigrants. Based on your approved petition, your spouse and minor unmarried children, younger than 21, may apply for immigrant visas with you. Like you, they must fill out required application forms, obtain required civil documents, pay the required fees, and undergo medical examinations.  To be considered for an immigrant visa under some of the employment-based categories listed above, the applicant’s prospective employer or agent must first obtain a labor certification approval from the Department of Labor. Once received (and if required), the employer must then file an Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker, Form I-140, with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for the appropriate employment-based preference category. However, persons with extraordinary abilities category may file their own petitions. Employment based immigrant visa cases take additional time […]
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B Visa: What is it? What can you do with it?

In general, when a citizen of a foreign country wishes to enter the United States, the foreign national must first obtain a visa. The visa allows a foreign national to travel to a U.S. port of entry and request permission of a U.S. immigration official to enter the United States. While Canadian Citizens are required to present a valid passport at the port of entry, they typically do not need a visa to enter the United States directly from Canada for the purposes of visiting or studying...
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Entering Canada with DWI: FAQs

Here at Berardi Immigration Law, we offer a wide variety of services to assist our clients. One such service is helping individuals with a DWI or DUI on their record enter Canada. Below is a list of the most common scenarios our office sees and some information on next steps…
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Holiday Travel to Canada

Avoid any extra stress during the holiday season by taking care of any immigration issues before travelling. If you have an impaired driving conviction on your record and would like to travel to Canada, our team may be able to help...
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Temporary Block on Immigrant Health Insurance Requirement

President Trump’s October 4th Proclamation has been temporarily blocked by a federal judge.  If allowed, it would require those seeking U.S. visas to obtain approved health insurance within 30 days of entry if they are not able to cover their own healthcare expenses. Judge Michael Simon, a Federal District Judge in Portland, Oregon, issued a nationwide temporary restraining order on Saturday, November 2, the day before the Proclamation was set to go into effect.  This order will prohibit the government from implementing the Proclamation for 28 days. During this time, the plaintiffs (seven U.S. citizens and a nonprofit group, Latino Network) and the defendants (various governmental agencies and officials)  will argue on whether the court should issue a preliminary injunction, which would block the Proclamation from becoming effective until the lawsuit has been completely resolved. In this suit, the plaintiffs are challenging the legality of the Proclamation, and if the judge issues a preliminary injunction, the Proclamation will be suspended until the judge makes the ultimate decision on whether the Proclamation is legal or illegal. This temporary restraining order comes weeks after a series of Federal Court decisions to temporarily block the Department of Homeland Security’s amended public charge rule from becoming effective. […]
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First Time Entry with An Immigrant Visa

Whether you are pursuing a marriage based green card, immigrating for your work, or being sponsored by a family member, obtaining a visa to enter the United States can be a time-consuming, stressful, and frustrating process. Every step of the way...
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IRCC Confirms Rules at the Border Surrounding DUIs

On December 18, 2018, Canada introduced much tougher penalties for individuals with convictions of DWI, DUI or DWAI. The new bill, titled the Impaired Driving Act, has made impaired driving a serious criminal offense in Canada, whereas it was previously only considered a criminal offense. To learn more about this, click here.  However, since the change, there have been rumors of officers treating these charges differently at the border. Now, almost two months after the change to the criminal law regarding DUIs in Canada, IRCC has finally confirmed that officers have been instructed of the following: a) impaired driving offenses (including foreign) committed on or after December 18, 2018 would be considered serious criminality; and b) offenses committed prior to this date would continue to be treated as criminality (providing they were not convicted in Canada and sentenced to more than six months). Please note that as always, if an individual has more than one DUI or DWAI offense, this will be treated as serious criminality.  This is in line with relevant case law in Canada and provides much needed clarity to our clients.  Berardi Immigration Law is now offering DWI and DUI permits into Canada! If you have a DUI or […]
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