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Tag: lpr

  • Naturalization Based on Marriage to a U.S. Citizen

    Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to a lawful permanent resident (“LPR”) after meeting certain requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (“INA”). The most common path to U.S. citizenship through naturalization is being an LPR for at least five years. However, there is a special provision in […]

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  • USCIS will Replace the Sticker Issued to Permanent Residents Extending the Validity of their Green Cards

    Starting this January, USCIS will be replacing the sticker issued to lawful permanent residents (“LPRs”) to extend the validity of their Green Card with a revised Form I-797, Notice of Action.  When a LPR’s Green Card expires or is about to expire, they must file a Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card. Previously, […]

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  • USCIS Revises Policy Guidance on Naturalization Applicants Who Erroneously Obtained Lawful Permanent Resident Status

    On November 18, 2020, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) updated its policy manual to reflect new guidance on when applicants would be ineligible for naturalization based on their lawful permanent resident (LPR) status. All naturalization applicants must establish that they were lawfully admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence at the time of filing […]

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  • Delay in Employment Authorization Documents (EADs) & Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) Cards

    Approximately 50,000 green cards and 75,000 employment authorization documents for approved cases have still not been printed as of July 16, 2020. Reasons for this reportedly vary from COVID-19 related delays, limited financial and personnel resources within USCIS, and current administration policies. In a statement dated July 21 by the USCIS Ombudsman, the agency states that it […]

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  • Featured Clients of the Month: Ted & Austhin

    Congratulations to our clients, Ted and Austhin, who recently completed the marriage-based green card process and were successfully approved! Ted is a U.S. citizen and Austhin is a citizen of Indonesia. Austhin recently received her ten-year green card with the help of our firm after filing an approved Form I-130 and attending an immigrant visa […]

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  • Client of the Month: Aaron Hakim

    Aaron Hakim has been a client of Berardi Immigration Law since 2014. As a Canadian citizen, we have successfully procured TN status for Mr. Hakim on two occasions now. But earlier this year, Mr. Hakim approached our firm to secure a more permanent U.S. immigration benefit, a green card. As an expert in Molecular Cellular […]

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  • Featured Client of the Month: Reza Kamran

    Berardi Immigration recently helped Reza Kamran obtain a Green Card in order to work for a company in the United States. Reza was thrilled to receive a job offer from a company in California but was unfamiliar with immigration firms and the process. Originally, Reza worked with the company’s internal corporate immigration lawyer. Unfortunately, this […]

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  • USCIS Implementing Signature Confirmation Delivery Service for Important Documents

    Beginning April 30, 2018, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began phasing in use of the U.S. Postal Service’s (USPS) Signature Confirmation Restricted Delivery service. The USPS service is now used to mail Green Cards and other secure immigration documents. It is important to note, however, that the first phase of this new delivery method […]

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  • Maintaining Green Card Status

    Once an individual is granted lawful permanent residence, that person maintains their status indefinitely. A green card holder is permitted to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis, but there are several ways that you can lose your status. Unlike a U.S. citizen, a lawful permanent resident can be removed from […]

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  • Can a U.S. Green Card be Revoked?

    Generally, a Green Card allows the holder to live and work in the U.S. on a permanent basis, but your rights as a lawful permanent resident are not absolute. The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) sets forth various grounds upon which a non-citizen may be deported. Keep in mind, however, an individual’s status as a […]

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